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nosaxyet
10/03/08 09:07:41 AM
DIY maintenance.... yes or no
I'd like some advice on carrying out maintenence on 'your own sax'. I'm talking of pad replecement, key action adjustment and the like. It is feasible or a non starter without proper training?


_________________
cheers

Ian

Alto: Keilwerth SX90R, Hanson SA-8S, Link Tone Edge 6, ZZ 2.5


Pete Thomas
10/03/08 09:22:57 AM
Re: DIY maintenance.... yes or no
It's possible, but it's best if you have an aptitude already for fiddly DIY stuff (e.g. model making).

If you are the sort of person who couldn't make a model aeroplane without gluing it and yourself to the sofa, then I'd steer clear of anything but the most rudimentary repairs.

First of all I would just try dismantling and reassembling the instrument. label all the parts and/or take photos as you progress. It should become obvious which order you need to do things in, but I would say the first things would be to remove any keys that aren't connected to others, e.g. the top palm keys.

There are some books available, try the link to the Reg Thorp book on this page (then 5% goes to my charity fund)

http://www.petethomas.co.uk/saxophone-repairs.html

If you rely on the horn, make sure there is an understanding pro within easy reach that you can run too if it all goes wrong.

Watch out for springs and corks dropping off.

_________________
Pete

xxxxxx

xxxxxx

nosaxyet
10/03/08 10:05:24 AM
Re: DIY maintenance.... yes or no
Pete Thomas wrote:
It's possible, but it's best if you have an aptitude already for fiddly DIY stuff (e.g. model making).

If you are the sort of person who couldn't make a model aeroplane without gluing it and yourself to the sofa, then I'd steer clear of anything but the most rudimentary repairs.

First of all I would just try dismantling and reassembling the instrument. label all the parts and/or take photos as you progress. It should become obvious which order you need to do things in, but I would say the first things would be to remove any keys that aren't connected to others, e.g. the top palm keys.

There are some books available, try the link to the Reg Thorp book on this page (then 5% goes to my charity fund)

http://www.petethomas.co.uk/saxophone-repairs.html

If you rely on the horn, make sure there is an understanding pro within easy reach that you can run too if it all goes wrong.

Watch out for springs and corks dropping off.


Pete

Thanks for the prompt response and the advice. I don't 'rely' on the horn other than I like to play every day and I have lessons each week. Just seems to me that it would make sense. Also, I would like to get an older tenor to restore one day and I need to start somewhere.

As for friendly 'pros' near-by - well I don't know anyone.

I did for many years build 1/43rd scale through to to 16th scale models though now don't have the time so hopefully it should be fine. I'll check out the book you recommended also.

Thanks for the advice.


_________________
cheers

Ian

Alto: Keilwerth SX90R, Hanson SA-8S, Link Tone Edge 6, ZZ 2.5


bob_green
10/03/08 11:13:43 AM
Re: DIY maintenance.... yes or no
If you have an aptitude for such things,basic maintenance and adjustment of your horn isn't too difficult. As a bit of a tinkerer I like to see how things work, and I'm confident about adjusting the action, fixing leaks, replacing corks and cleaning/lubrication, all the kinds of things that keep your horn working. I've never replaced a pad but would certainly consider giving it a go. I also reassembled a straight soprano once, which had been bought in bits, and restored it to playing condition.

One tip I picked up early on is to remember where you started if you can, so you can always put things back to where they were; quite imporant when trying to adjust various interacting screws etc.

_________________
Cheers, Bob

The ideal number of musical instruments to own is always one more than you currently own.

frankb
10/03/08 11:58:25 AM
Re: DIY maintenance.... yes or no
One tip (from the world of PC maintenance!) -

Before removing anything look to see where it is now and how it fits in there. As you go along, take many, many pictures with a digicam and give them meaningful file names prefixed with a sequential number (so you know in which order you did things).

It helps you avoid ending up with a fully-assembled but non-functional sax and a little box of 'spares'!



bob_green
10/03/08 12:01:15 PM
Re: DIY maintenance.... yes or no
Right, Frank! How many times have I stripped a piece of equipment and ended up with a spare screw or two after reassembly?

Possibly not too bad on an ATM, but on a sax it's vital to have no bits left over at the end of the job!


_________________
Cheers, Bob

One man's workhorse is another man's donkey

frankb
10/03/08 12:18:38 PM
Re: DIY maintenance.... yes or no
My favourite prat-fall with PC's is unplugging a jumper cable without making damn sure I know where it's come from. Later in the day you'll find me with the cable in my hand and a bemused expression on my face as I stare at the six identical sockets on the motherboard in the vain hope of inspiration!

I'd hate to see someone holding a spring and looking at a sax with the same expression...



nosaxyet
10/03/08 12:22:56 PM
Re: DIY maintenance.... yes or no
Thanks everyone. Well for s starter........ I've just remove the three LH palm keys, cleaned the pads, cleaned and oiled the pins and replaced without too much trouble. However none of them have sticking!!

_________________
cheers

Ian

Alto: Keilwerth SX90R, Hanson SA-8S, Link Tone Edge 6, ZZ 2.5


griff136
10/03/08 6:33:09 PM
Re: DIY maintenance.... yes or no
one tip if you do start stripping the keys off your sax then i would suggest you put the pivot screws and key rods/axles back into their posts so that you
a. dont get them mixed up - pme saxes have 2 different size pivot screws.

b. avoid the hassle of putting a rod in the wrong key and not finding out it wrng until you get to the last rod and its either too long or too short.!

you could get a pice of MDF or wood and drill holes in it and mark each hole with the key - remember that keys with pivot screw will usually have 2!



_________________
Griff

http://www.dg-music.co.uk

bob_green
10/03/08 9:45:43 PM
Re: DIY maintenance.... yes or no
Before you do any of these things though, just have a good, long look at your saxophone from every angle and ponder on what you are gazing at; an absolutely amazing, totally marvellous and beautiful piece of engineering bordering on a work of art.

_________________
Cheers, Bob

More saxophones and guitars than is strictly necessary.

jools
11/03/08 00:00:58 AM
Re: DIY maintenance.... yes or no
some great advice here, and good on you for being curious!

My experience has been that doing things like this really put you in touch with your sax. You really start to 'own' it when you know how it ticks. But, as many have said, be very careful. There are lots of delicate bits that can be broken easily - in particular corks. Sometimes the glue has become brittle and they just tumble off. If they do it's time for some rubber glue, toothpicks and patience to get them back on.

Totally agree with the photo idea (if you have a digital camera that can do good close-ups) take loads of photos of the bits you intend to take apart. Just so you know how it should look (prior to taking them off) Some of them are linked together by the same rod, and as soon as that comes out a whole pile of keys all fall off in a heap!

I'd avoid trying to replace pads. There are some 'specialised' bits of equipment you'd need to get them to 'sit', but there's no harm in stripping it to clean it and even replace the odd cork, or even felt in places where it clicks. It's great fun.

Still, if all else fails, you can't really do much damage and there's sure to be a repair guy happy to put your efforts right somewhere. They love it (don't they Griff )

_________________
Me old mate... Xero Slingsby & The Works -Ich liebe entartete Musik:
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